New Computer System Can Examine Any Genome Sequence and Decipher Its Genetic Code

Yekaterina “Kate” Shulgina was a very first yr student in the Graduate Faculty of Arts and Sciences, searching for a small computational biology project so she could look at the prerequisite off her program in methods biology. She questioned how genetic code, after assumed to be universal, could evolve and transform.

That was 2016 and right now Shulgina has arrive out the other stop of that shorter-term project with a way to decipher this genetic secret. She describes it in a new paper in the journal eLife with Harvard biologist Sean Eddy.

The report particulars a new laptop or computer program that can study the genome sequence of any organism and then identify its genetic code. The system, named Codetta, has the prospective to help experts increase their comprehending of how the genetic code evolves and effectively interpret the genetic code of recently sequenced organisms.

“This in and of alone is a pretty elementary biology question,” claimed Shulgina, who does her graduate investigation in Eddy’s Lab.

The genetic code is the established of rules that tells the cells how to interpret the three-letter combinations of nucleotides into proteins, normally referred to as the constructing blocks of daily life. Pretty much every single organism, from E. coli to humans, makes use of the identical genetic code. It is why the code was the moment imagined to be set in stone. But experts have discovered a handful of outliers — organisms that use alternative genetic codes – exist wherever the established of guidance are various.

This is where by Codetta can shine. The method can help to identify much more organisms that use these substitute genetic codes, assisting shed new mild on how genetic codes can even modify in the to start with area.

“Understanding how this transpired would enable us reconcile why we initially thought this was impossible… and how these really elementary procedures truly get the job done,” Shulgina explained.

Previously, Codetta has analyzed the genome sequences of about 250,000 micro organism and other solitary-celled organisms termed archaea for alternate genetic codes, and has determined five that have by no means been observed. In all 5 instances, the code for the amino acid arginine was reassigned to a diverse amino acid. It’s considered to mark the first-time researchers have observed this swap in microorganisms and could trace at evolutionary forces that go into altering the genetic code.

The researchers say the study marks the most significant screening for substitute genetic codes. Codetta in essence analyzed every single genome that’s out there for micro organism and archaea. The title of the method is a cross in between the codons, the sequence of three nucleotides that varieties parts of the genetic code, and the Rosetta Stone, a slab of rock inscribed with a few languages.

The work marks a capstone moment for Shulgina, who invested the previous five a long time building the statistical theory driving Codetta, crafting the system, screening it, and then examining the genomes. It will work by looking

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FBI system hacked to email ‘urgent’ warning about fake cyberattacks

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) email servers were hacked to distribute spam email impersonating FBI warnings that the recipients’ network was breached and data was stolen.

The emails pretended to warn about a “sophisticated chain attack” from an advanced threat actor known, who they identify as Vinny Troia. Troia is the head of security research of the dark web intelligence companies NightLion and Shadowbyte

The spam-tracking nonprofit SpamHaus noticed that tens of thousands of these messages were delivered in two waves early this morning. They believe this is just a small part of the campaign.

Legitimate address delivers fake content

Researchers at the Spamhaus Project, an international nonprofit that tracks spam and associated cyber threats (phishing, botnets, malware), observed two waves of this campaign, one at 5 AM (UTC) and a second one two hours later.

The messages came from a legitimate email address – [email protected]c.fbi.gov – which is from FBI’s Law Enforcement Enterprise Portal (LEEP), and carried the subject “Urgent: Threat actor in systems.”

All emails came from the FBI’s IP address 153.31.119.142 (mx-east-ic.fbi.gov), Spamhaus told us.

Fake cyber attack alert from legit FBI email address

The message warns that a threat actor has been detected in the recipients’ network and has stolen data from devices.

Our intelligence monitoring indicates exfiltration of several of your virtualized clusters in a sophisticated chain attack. We tried to blackhole the transit nodes used by this advanced persistent threat actor, however there is a huge chance he will modify his attack with fastflux technologies, which he proxies trough multiple global accelerators. We identified the threat actor to be Vinny Troia, whom is believed to be affiliated with the extortion gang TheDarkOverlord, We highly recommend you to check your systems and IDS monitoring. Beware this threat actor is currently working under inspection of the NCCIC, as we are dependent on some of his intelligence research we can not interfere physically within 4 hours, which could be enough time to cause severe damage to your infrastructure.


Stay safe,

U.S. Department of Homeland Security | Cyber Threat Detection and Analysis | Network Analysis Group

Spamhaus Project told BleepingComputer that the fake emails reached at least 100,000 mailboxes. The number is a very conservative estimate, though, as the researchers believe “the campaign was potentially much, much larger.”

In a tweet today, the nonprofit said that the recipients were scraped from the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN) database.

While this looks like a prank, there is no doubt that the emails originate from the FBI’s servers as the headers of the message show that its origin is verified by the DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) mechanism.

Received: from mx-east-ic.fbi.gov ([153.31.119.142]:33505 helo=mx-east.fbi.gov)
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   Q==;
   X-IronPort-AV: E=McAfee;i="6200,9189,10166"; a="4964109"
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Received: from dap00025.str0.eims.cjis ([10.67.35.50])
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New PSEG storm computer system won’t be ready until December

PSEG Long Island’s approach to deploy an completely new storm computer management system has been pushed back again to December or even afterwards, top officers claimed at a LIPA board meeting Friday.

A PSEG official famous there was “some possibility” that even a December deadline could be skipped.

Individually during the same board conference, LIPA acting chairman Mark Fischl also issued PSEG an ultimatum to conclude prolonged-delayed negotiations for a new agreement.

PSEG Prolonged Island president Dan Eichhorn identified as next Friday “our fall-useless day” for finalizing a new contract that has been delayed for months, including there was “a humongous feeling of urgency” to fulfill that deadline.

But his claims drew cautious responses from LIPA board customers. “If we you should not get this finished in November, we are going to be searching for other possibilities,” said Fischl, suggesting LIPA could rekindle a prior effort and hard work to obtain other third-party contractors or even go entirely general public.

“This has just been heading on for way too prolonged,” Fischl claimed, referring to former programs to finalize a deal in August.

“You say you can find a perception of urgency but we have not seen that,” included trustee Alfred Cockfield.

Trustees also expressed wariness in excess of PSEG’s shifting schedules to deploy the new storm outage-administration laptop system.

PSEG Very long Island is one particular of only two utilities in the country working with an obsolete edition of the system, for which ratepayers are shelling out over $3 million a month to mend and eventually switch. A newer version of the process, an iteration of which had been in position in the course of the storm, was supposed to be rebuilt and back again in place in the spring. But that was pushed back until eventually immediately after storm time this fall, leaving PSEG still utilizing the outdated system.

In a report to trustees, LIPA mentioned that PSEG, in relying on an more mature edition of the laptop or computer technique, nonetheless has “not targeted on identifying the root leads to of the [computer system’s] failures,” concentrating as an alternative on a strategy aimed at lowering the selection of customer calls to the procedure so that it is “never ever subjected to anxiety.”

Through a board committee meeting, trustees elevated thoughts about the prices and delays. PSEG Lengthy Island chief info officer Greg Filipkowski mentioned the current approximated forecast to get the new program up and working, in addition to previous remediation costs, was close to $42 million. Some $33 million has currently been spent to date, in accordance to a finance report.

Trustee Sheldon Cohen famous with exasperation the shifting completion timelines for the new system of June, November and now December, and trustee Drew Biondo observed, “It truly is

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