AI babies: New technology is helping fertility docs choose the best embryos for IVF

AI babies: New technology is helping fertility docs choose the best embryos for IVF

It’s been shown to detect cancer, pinpoint cavities and answer medical questions — and now, artificial intelligence may help fertility doctors select the ideal embryo for in-vitro fertilization (IVF).

With one in every five U.S. adult married women unable to get pregnant after a year of trying, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), many turn to IVF for help. The fertility treatment is responsible for between 1% and 2% of all births in the country.

The process, however, is not guaranteed — and it’s expensive, averaging more than $12,000 per session, according to the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. And most women require more than one attempt. 

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AIVF, a reproductive technology company based in Tel Aviv, Israel, aims to improve the odds. 

Its AI-powered embryo evaluation software, called EMA, is designed to process vast amounts of data — beyond what the human eye can detect — to simplify the embryo selection process.

AIVF team

AIVF, a reproductive tech company in Tel Aviv, Israel, offers an AI-powered embryo evaluation software, EMA, to simplify the embryo selection process. Shown here are AIVF team members.  (AIVF)

“IVF is one of the most important medical developments in the last 50 years, but it’s not good enough,” Daniella Gilboa, an embryologist who is co-founder and CEO of AIVF, told Fox News Digital. 

“Success rates are about 23% to 25% across all age groups, which means only one in five result in pregnancy.”

In the U.S., only 20% of the demand for IVF can be met by existing clinics, said the CEO of AIVF, which is based in Israel.

One of the biggest challenges is that IVF clinics can’t keep up with the growing demand, Gilboa said. 

“More women are freezing their eggs so they can delay childbirth and focus on their careers, which means demand for IVF is growing — but supply is limited,” she said. 

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“In the U.S., only 20% of the need is served, which means 80% of those women are giving up on the dream of having a child.”

One of the most crucial decision points during the IVF process is embryo selection, Gilboa explained. 

Daniella Gilboa

“IVF is one of the most important medical developments in the last 50 years, but it’s not good enough,” Daniella Gilboa, an embryologist who is the co-founder and CEO of AIVF (pictured here), told Fox News Digital.  (AIVF)

Traditionally, human clinicians have been tasked with making that choice on their own.

“Imagine if you’re an embryologist, looking at multiple embryos in a hectic lab environment, and you have to decide which one has the best potential to become a baby,” she said. 

“You might have eight, 10 or 12 embryos that all look the same — and you have to make that crucial decision, sometimes by yourself. It’s basically you and the embryos under

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